The Asiana crash and flight attendant training

ImageMore than “Singapore Girls’: Safety emphasized in airline’s grueling training course by Harriet Baskas originally appeared on NBC News Travel July 12, 2013

Cabin attendants on carriers in the United States and elsewhere can skip the sarong-swimming lessons, but they must all pass an annual refresher course in safety measures.

In addition to reviewing medical and evacuation procedures, this annual recurrent training often includes discussion of accidents and incidents that occurred the year before. “We discuss what went wrong, how the crew reacted and how they could have done things differently,” said Heather Poole, a flight attendant on a major U.S. carrier and author of “Cruising Attitude.”

And while the Asiana crash shines a light on the job performance of flight attendants, Poole predicts fearful passengers will start asking about the experience of the pilots on board.

“But just know,” she said, “flight attendants wouldn’t work a flight if they felt uncomfortable with the cockpit crew.

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[Photo credit: Chris and Sue]

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3 Comments

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3 responses to “The Asiana crash and flight attendant training

  1. JR

    Some interesting differences on SQ compared to US flag carriers. One I always note is on takeoff/landing, the SQ FA’s require every passenger to open their window shades. Such a simple thing, and so obvious. They are also much more diligent about Pax having nothing in their laps, and the FA’s change their shoes from the softer slippers they wear inflight into more practical footwear. All Good ideas, but not exactly common within US.

  2. 15 weeks seemed like a very long time for training, until I read that they only spend two weeks on emergency training. Working for a US airline, the bulk of our 6 weeks was spent on safety and emergency training. I think we spent 3 days on service training in the classroom.

  3. JR

    Lol Noah. Some airlines view FA’s as advertising for the country and the Gov’t, and their work rules would land a US carrier in court in 5 minutes. Go back to USA 1960′s-70′s with rules on height, weight, marital status, age… Interesting tidbit, SQ requires FAs to learn all business and first Kris Flyer Pax names before they board. And they are good at it. Suspect that CWA would quite rightly protest that… Not relevant to safety or anything, it’s just advertising. But it is effective. FYI, SQ service is outstanding and contributes to safety, IMHO.

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