Tag Archives: interview

Everything you ever wanted to know about being a flight attendant…

Book View TV interviewed me about my book, Cruising Attitude: Tales of Crashpads, Crew Drama and Crazy Passengers at 30,000 Feet.  Basically we discussed everything you ever wanted to know about being a flight attendant.

PART 1:  BARBIE BOOT CAMP.  A little bit about how my book Cruising Attitude came to be, and what it’s like, really like, to be a flight attendant

PART 2: SKY ROMANCE?   What’s a crashpad?  Why do flight attendants commute?  How does it work?  How do flight attendants balance flying with life on the ground?  It ain’t easy.  And what about dating pilots?  Watch here….

PART 3: TURBULENT GLAMOUR. It’s not a glamorous life.  We discuss flight attendant pay, uniforms, and what scares me more than turbulence.

PART 4:  THE CRAZIES. What it’s like to work on a private jet, why passengers go crazy in flight, and a little bit about special passengers (AKA frequent fliers)

2 Comments

Filed under Uncategorized

The Paul Harris Show: Flight Attendants, Crashpads, Delays, THE MILE HIGH CLUB

3This interview originally appeared on The Paul Harris Show

I predict this will be one of my most-downloaded interviews. It was certainly a lot of fun for me. On my America Weekend show, I talked with Heather Poole, who has been a flight attendant for major airlines for 15 years and has written about her adventures in “Cruising Altitude: Tales Of Crashpads, Crew Drama, and Crazy Passengers at 35,000 Feet.” We talked about passengers trying to get into the mile high club (without bothering to move to the bathroom!), whether checked-luggage fees are causing havoc during the boarding process, and whether she has had many male passengers hit on her. She also revealed something I didn’t know about when the payday really starts for flight attendants, and what it’s like in the apartments they share in various cities during layovers.

LISTEN

4 Comments

Filed under Uncategorized

2013 New Year’s Travel Resolution

photo-40This originally appeared on Conde Nast Traveler’s website: New Year’s Resolutions from Travel Bloggers, Chefs, and Other VIPsTHE FLIGHT ATTENDANT
Heather Poole

Be more fully present: “As a flight attendant I spend a lot of time looking ahead—to the next flight, the next crew, the next group of passengers, the next layover, the next couple of days off, the next month’s schedule. Before I know it another month goes by and the next thing I know we’re ringing in a new year and I can barely remember what happened leading up to it. It’s all one big, hazy blue blur. So this year I’m going to work harder at focusing on the moment. By living in the now, stress and anxiety over what I can’t control gets left behind and simple things become beautiful moments that last a lifetime. Like sitting in a jump seat on a very early flight and watching the rays of sunlight peak through the clouds and make its way into the quiet cabin across the faces of passengers lost in thought on takeoff. Such a quiet beauty that goes unnoticed on most flights.”

READ MORE

7 Comments

Filed under Uncategorized

Flight attendants: The good, the bad, and the not so ugly world of flying

232323232fp73452>nu=3277>273>5;5>WSNRCG=377646<89732-nu0mrjThe Azumano Travel Show, a weekend travel radio show on KPAM out of Portland, Oregon, had me on the air last week to discuss my book,  Cruising Attitude: Tales of Crashpads, Crew Drama and Crazy Passengers at 35,000 feet - and what’s it’s like, really like to be a flight attendant.  You can listen by clicking the links below.

Azumano Travel Show: Heather Poole (Part One): Celebrities, traveling with kids, the mile high club, naked passengers

Azumano Travel Show: Heather Poole (Part two): What kind of person makes a good flight attendant, how flying has changed over the years

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

2 Boomer Babes (and a flight attendant) Radio Hour

A flight attendant’s job is a tough one – from the long unpaid layovers on the ground, to dealing with unruly, and downright wacky passengers in the sky. Flight attendant, Heather Poole tells all in Cruising Attitude: Tales of Crashpads, Crew Drama, and Crazy Passengers at 35,000 Feet. – 2BoomerBabes

I had so much fun talking to Barbara Kline and Kathy Bernard on their radio show 2BoomerBabes.  We discussed crazy passengers, the mile high club, and turbulence.  To listen CLICK HERE.  (starts at the 38 minute mark)

 

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

How being married to a flight attendant is great training for the job

Hi Heather, My wife is a flight attendant and for some time now I’ve been looking to make a career change and was thinking ofbecoming a flight attendant myself. I can see how she enjoys it and has fun with it and I’d like to try it, too. Do you think it would be a good or bad thing to bring up in an interview situation that I am married to a flight attendant or does it matter at all? Obviously being married to one gives me a greater insight and depth of understanding of the job and what it involves compared to many other candidates. I have a degree in Microbiology so I have somewhat of a brain, although my wife might debate that with you. I also co-managed a bar in Ireland before I came to the United States so I know what it’s like to have to deal with difficult and intoxicated customers. I also was an airport screener for a while and I’m a state certified emergency responder. I’d like to think these things would make me a strong candidate. Just curious what you think. Thanks for your time, Brian.

Based on your work experience alone, you sound like the perfect candidate to me! You’re comfortable cutting people off handling intoxicated passengers, you’re familiar with the responsibilities that go along with working at an airport, and you have a pretty good idea of what life is like in the sky. Being a certified emergency trainer will only make you more attractive to the airlines. Your wife, I’m sure, has mentioned that no one ever dies in flight, right? At least not until a doctor can make an official pronouncement. This might be why so many flight attendants have nursing backgrounds. Some are even senior enough to hold a flying schedule that allows them to balance a nursing career at the same time. These are always my favorite flight attendants to work with because when there’s an emergency in flight, they tend to take over. That being said, I truly believe it’s your wife that makes you a standout.

KEEP READING

2 Comments

Filed under Uncategorized

The Travel Show with Arthur and Pauline Frommer discuss Cruising Attitude & what it’s like to be a flight attendant.

Click the link below to hear Pauline Frommer call my book “a good beach read,”  It sounds like she really enjoyed it.  Check it out…

The Travel Show – June 10, 2012 – Hour 2: Heather Poole, author of “Cruising Attitude”, tells of her experiences as a flight attendant, both good and bad… 

3 Comments

Filed under Uncategorized

Interview with Nomadic Matt on what it’s like to be a flight attendant today

Heather Poole

This post originally appeared on NomadicMatt.com

I first met Heather Poole at the first travel blog conference. We got along very well and I had been reading her blog for awhile. She writes about life as a flight attendant. Recently, she published a book,Cruising Attitude: Tales of Crashpads, Crew Drama, and Crazy Passengers at 35,000 Feet, about life as a flight attendant. I, ironically, picked it up at an airport and read it on a plane. She found time her time at 35,000 feet to talk about her job and book.

Nomadic Matt: You’re a flight attendant. What’s that like? 
Heather Poole: Even though the job has changed a lot over the years, it can still be a lot of fun. But patience is a must, more so than ever before. Flight attendants are the face of the airline and passengers have a tendency to take things out on us, even if what happened is not our fault. Besides being friendly and outgoing, we also have to be able to adapt to change easily. This is why we always have back up plans A, B and C, because there’s always something bound to go wrong in the airline industry. Mechanicals. Delays. Cancellations. They happen. Even on Christmas Eve. If there are kids at home this can be one of the most difficult aspects of the job. Flight attendants also are very independent. It’s not uncommon to meet a coworker for the first on a trip and then not see them again for a few months, maybe even years. The best part about the job is when we step off the airplane, we always leave the stress of the flight behind. Every flight is a new flight, which means every day is a new adventure.

How often do flight attendants work? Do they fly a lot of the same routes over and over again? 
Our schedules average around 85 hours a month. But don’t let the number fool you. That’s flying time only. Most flight attendants work way more than that.  Time on the ground doesn’t count towards our pay and therefore isn’t included in our monthly schedules This is why we want to spend as much time as possible in the air, not hopping from city to city with lots of time between flights on the ground. Airline seniority determines the kind of trip a flight attendant can hold. This explains why most international long haul flights are staffed with senior crews. Once we have enough seniority to hold a good trip, it’s the only trip we’re going to work until we’re senior enough to hold an even better one. Schedules are set up with a day or two off between each trip, but many of us will “trip trade” with other flight attendants to work a few trips in a row in order to maximize our time off on the ground.

Any hint on the airline you work for? 
One of the big ones.

What did your co-workers think of you writing this book? 
I don’t know that most of them even know I’ve written a book. And if they do know, they probably just assume I’m still writing it. I’ve been talking about writing this book for years.

Did your airline know and were there any restrictions placed on you?
I didn’t ask for their permission to write the book, and I certainly didn’t call anyone up at headquarters to make an announcement about it either. Flight attendants learn to lay low very early on in their careers. But I’ve been blogging about flying for a long time. I’m fairly certain they know who I am. Just keep in mind my book is not an airline expose. It’s about what it’s like to be a flight attendant. It doesn’t really matter who we work for, the job is pretty much the same wherever you go. Plus half of the book takes place on the ground because it’s not just a job, it’s a lifestyle. That’s what I set out to write about. Plus, there are so many misconceptions about flight attendants I decided to set the record straight.

What is one really juicy story you left out? 
One story that got deleted was about a celebrity who claimed to have magical powers after a passenger fell unconscious. To this day, we still don’t know if it was his magical powers or the husband who kept nudging his wife in the arm in an effort to make her come to and see the celebrity he was excitedly talking about that made her gain consciousness again.

With so many changes to the airline industry over the years, would you recommend someone become a flight attendant?…

KEEP READING

1 Comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Advice for writers & my chick lit inspiration

This interview originally appeared on ChickLitCentralTheBlog.com 

What was the most challenging part of writing “Cruising Attitude?” 
Finding time to write. I’ve been talking about writing a book for years. After awhile even close friends and family didn’t take me seriously when I’d talk about it. I’m a flight attendant, wife and mother. It’s not easy balancing all that without also trying to find time to work on a book. When I was writing I’d feel guilty about not spending time with my family. When I was spending time with my family I’d feel guilty about not writing. I should also mention it took a few years to realize the first book I was working on was the wrong book, even though every agent and publishing house told me this multiple times. I didn’t believe them. Turns out they were right! Blogging helped me find my way. When you blog you get immediate feedback from readers. You learn what they like and what they want to know more about. It’s why I now tell struggling writers to know who their market is and to give them what they want.

Who are two authors who inspired you to write?
Writing really starts with reading. The first author who truly captured my attention was Judy Blume. In grade school I checked out every single one of her books after reading “Are You There God, It’s Me Margaret.” I couldn’t get enough of her. That’s how my love of books with a strong female voice began. The book that inspired me to start writing was “Catcher In the Rye,” although as I read it I don’t think I was completely conscious that I wanted to write. But the conversational tone is what got me thinking that maybe, just maybe, I could do that – on a much lower level of course! Sarah Dunn’s “The Big Love”is the book I kept on my writing desk to use as motivation when I first began writing, the perfect combination of “Catcher in the Rye” meets the best of chicklit.

What do you think the key is to a successful chick lit novel? Lots of sexiness? A studly hero? Plenty of angst? 
A strong voice people can relate to. Although we’re more connected because of cell phones, Facebook, twitter and the like, we’re also more disconnected than ever before. This is why I think reality TV is so popular today. Writing something that’s real and true, something that people can relate to on an emotional level, is more important than ever before.

KEEP READING (and enter to win a free copy of my book)

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

AOL’s You’ve Got video series features “the real life of a flight attendant”

It’s not my favorite interview, but it came out much better than I thought it would.  Honestly I was kind of nervous about this one. I can’t tell you how many times we had to stop filming because of cars honking, airplanes landing, helicopters hovering above, or because the wind was blowing way too hard. “I’ve never had such a difficult shoot,” said the producer an hour into it.  He was talking about my hair.  It was all over the place.  Each time we had to wait for the noise to die down, I’d completely forget what I was saying.  I now have an all new respect for reporters who film on location.  Trust me, it’s much harder than it looks.

Description: Writer and flight attendant Heather Poole discusses common misconceptions about air travel. Poole has worked for a major carrier for more than 17 years and is the author of “Cruising Attitude: Tales of Crashpads, Crew Drama, and Crazy Passengers at 35,000 Feet.” (1:29)

CLICK HERE to watch YOU’VE GOT HEATHER POOLE.  And find out why love isn’t always in the air – or on the ground.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized